Historic Preservation

Oak Park Historic Preservation Ordinance

Oak Park Historic Preservation Guidelines

Oak Park Historic District Map

Downtown Oak Park Architectural Survey

Oak Park Historic Preservation Commission

Universal Access in Historic Buildings

National Trust for Historic Preservtion

Illinois Historic Preservation Agency

Landmarks Illinois

Preservation Chicago

Save the Point (Promontory Point)

Commission on Chicago Landmarks

Chicago Architecture Foundation

Henry Schlacks Society

 

OAK PARK HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION

ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW GUIDELINES

Note that these Guidelines are mandatory for Oak Park Landmarks
and advisory for other buildings located in Oak Park historic districts

Approved January 18, 1994
Modified March 15, 1999




A. Preamble

These Architectural Review Guidelines are intended to be followed by Owners in remodeling existing buildings, adding to existing  buildings, or constructing new buildings in the Village of Oak Park.  They will be the principles by which the Historic Preservation Commission will review submittals for proposed work within the historic districts or work on Oak Park Landmarks.  The Guidelines are not meant to be exhaustive or all-encompassing.  They are expected to be used in the most general sense, considering that every project is unique.   Many options will be available to the Owner in following the intention of the Guidelines.  These Guidelines are mandatory for all Oak Park Landmarks and are advisory for other buildings located within the Oak Park historic districts.

The purpose for architectural review is to protect the unique visual qualities of a building and its site that define their sense of history from inappropriate proposed alterations that will reduce that sense.  The basic principles of review are to determine that the following qualities of the building and site are compatible with both the building in question and its neighborhood context:

1. Siting
2. Massing
3. Scale
4. Materials
5. Street rhythm
The Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings published by the Department of the Interior National Park Service, revised 1990, is the standard that the Historic Preservation Commission will follow in the architectural review process, and is appended by reference.  This 59-page pamphlet is available from the Village of Oak Park, the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency in Springfield, Illinois, or the U.S. Government Printing Office in Washington, D.C. 20402.  It is also online at http://www2.cr.nps.gov/tps/tax/rhb/index.htm.  The ten standards included in this document are as follows:
 
1.  A property shall be used for its historic purpose or be placed in a new use that requires minimal change to the defining characteristics of the building and its site and environment.

2.  The historic character of a property shall be retained and preserved.  The removal of historic materials or alteration of features and spaces that characterize a property shall be avoided.

3.  Each property shall be recognized as a physical record of its time, place, and use.  Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or architectural elements from other buildings, shall not be undertaken.

4.  Most properties change over time; those changes that have acquired historic significance in their own right shall be retained and preserved.

5.  Distinctive features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a historic property shall be preserved.

6.  Deteriorated historic features shall be repaired rather than replaced.  Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature shall match the old in design, color, texture, and other visual qualities, and, where possible, materials.  Replacement of missing features shall be substantiated by documentary, physical, or pictorial evidence.

7.  Chemical or physical treatments, such as sandblasting, that cause damage to historic materials shall not be used.  The surface cleaning of structures, if appropriate, shall be undertaken using the gentlest means possible.

8.  Significant archaeological resources affected by a project shall be protected and preserved.  If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures shall be undertaken.

9.  New additions, exterior alterations, or related new construction shall not destroy historic materials that characterize the property.  The new work shall be differentiated from the old and shall be compatible with the massing, size, scale, and architectural features to protect the historic integrity of the property and its environment.

10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction shall be undertaken in such a manner that if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.

B.  Establishing Historic Contextual Character:

Prior to review of any project, the Historic Preservation Commission will establish the historic character of the property being reviewed and its context through study of the drawings and visits to the site.   To establish the inherent historic character of the building, the historic district, or the immediate neighborhood of the building in question, the Commission will determine the following:

  1. Siting
    1. Landscape style
    2. Major tree locations
    3. Building setbacks
    4. Garage and automobile access
    5. Driveways
    6. Fencing
  2. Massing
    1. Building Height to Width ratio
    2. Rhythm of facade opening spacing
    3. Major divisions of street facade into "bays"
    4. Overall plan shape
    5. Roof shapes
    6. Roof slopes
    7. Chimney location (center, ridge, slope)
    8. Roof overhangs
    9. Ratio of solid to void in facade (i.e., window openings to wall)
    10. Height to width ratio of windows
  3. Scale
    1. Lot width to building width
    2. Number of stories
    3. Size of material textures
  4. Materials
    1. Roofing materials
    2. Gutters and downspouts
    3. Wall materials
    4. Trim around windows and doors
    5. Colors of roof, walls, and trim
    6. Decorative cornices
    7. Window types (double hung, casement, leaded glass, Palladian)
    8. Door types (flush, paneled, glazed)
    9. Porch types (partial, full, wraparound, screened, enclosed, none)
  5. Street rhythm
    1. Historic styles in the area
    2. Building massing of adjacent buildings
    3. Roof shapes of adjacent buildings
    4. Roof slopes of adjacent buildings
C. Materials that may be requested to be submitted by Owner to Historic Preservation Commission for architectural review:
  1. Site plan showing building, proposed additions, and existing and proposed landscaping (minimum scale 1" = 20'-0")
  2. Demolition plans (minimum scale 1/4" = 1'-0")
  3. Proposed new construction plans (minimum scale 1/4" = 1'-0")
  4. Proposed new construction details
  5. Masonry, tuckpointing, roofing, siding, and window specifications
  6. Color photographs (or color photocopy of photograph) of all elevations
  7. Photographs (or photocopy of photograph) of all areas to be demolished
  8. Work write-up, material specifications, and cost estimate
In addition, the architectural review team of the Historic Preservation Commission will make at least one site visit.
D. Do not do any work prior to the architectural review, and especially do not do any of the following types of work due to their irreversible nature:
    1. Do not do any demolition or removal of historic materials
    2. Do not remove windows
    3. Do not sandblast or high-pressure wash historic materials
    4. Do not tuckpoint masonry

    5.  
E. Definitions:
  1. Decorative windows:  Historic windows that possess special architectural value, or contribute to the building's historic, cultural, or aesthetic character.  Decorative windows are those with leaded glass, art glass, stained glass, beveled glass, prismatic glass, Luxfer prisms, or specially shaped windows such as lancet, round-arched, oriel, or Palladian windows.
  2. Demolition:  The razing or destruction, whether entirely or in a significant part of a building, structure or object.  Demolition includes the removal of a building, structure or object from its site or the removal or destruction of its facade or surface.
  3. Historic material (or object):  Material (or object) from which the building is built which is older than 50 years.
  4. Maintain:  To keep a building and grounds in an acceptable state of good repair and function in accordance with the requirements of the Oak Park Codes that apply to buildings.
  5. Masonry:  Brick, concrete block,  or natural stone
  6. Period of significance:  The time period in which the building was first built or during which it has derived its historic significance, as stated in the historic landmark or historic district nomination.
  7. Reversible:  New construction work that can be removed in the future without requiring demolition of historic materials.
  8. Repair:  To maintain a building or portion of a building in place using the same materials that exist, or with very minimal addition of new materials. (note that this definition is different from the definition of "Repair" in the Historic Preservation Ordinance, because it is used in a different context herein.)
  9. Synthetic siding or soffits:  Aluminum, vinyl, cement-asbestos shingles, thin pressed wood (masonite), plywood sheeting, or similar materials which are used to imitate other materials on buildings for siding or soffits, and which are non-historic.  Synthetic siding or soffits were normally used, but not always, to cover original historic siding and soffit material.
  10. Technically Infeasible:  Not possible to accomplish something due to substantial additional cost in comparison to approved alternative methods that meet these guidelines.
  11. Tuckpointing:  Repointing masonry by removing existing mortar from joints and filling with new mortar.
  12. Visible from the Street:  Able to be seen by a person walking on the public street or sidewalks along the street on which a building is located.  In the case of a building located on a corner lot, the street means both streets on which the building is located.  "Street" does not mean the alley behind the building.
  13. For definitions of other commonly-used terms, please refer to Steven J. Phillips, The Old House Dictionary, American Source Books, Lakewood, Colorado, 1989.
F. Masonry Repair Policy
  1. Repair rather than replace masonry materials unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  2. If replacement of masonry materials is necessary, replacement materials shall be the same color, texture, and type of material as that which is being replaced, unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  3. Do not sandblast masonry.
  4. Do not high-pressure water blast masonry.
  5. Tuckpointing shall be done following National Park Service Preservation Brief Number 2 and Illinois Preservation Brief Number 10.
  6. Use cement-lime mortars appropriate to the type of masonry to be tuckpointed.
  7. Do not use premixed "masonry cements" that contain no lime for tuckpointing.
  8. Joint profiles and colors of tuckpointing shall match existing historic tuckpointing.
  9. Do not parge or apply stucco to masonry surfaces that were not historically parged or stuccoed.
  10. Do not install synthetic siding over masonry materials.

  11.  
G. Siding and Soffit Policy
  1. Repair rather than replace siding and soffit materials unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  2. If replacement of siding and soffit materials is necessary, replacement materials shall be the same color, texture, and type of material as that which is being replaced, unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  3. Do not sandblast siding and soffits.
  4. Do not high pressure water blast siding and soffits.
  5. Where synthetic siding or soffits exist, it is recommended to remove it and repair the original historic siding under it, unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  6. The Commission may approve new synthetic siding or soffits subject to the following requirements:
    1. Existing wood siding or soffits are so deteriorated or damaged that they cannot be economically repaired.
    2. The synthetic siding or soffit material can be installed without removing, damaging, or obscuring character-defining architectural features or trim.
    3. The synthetic siding or soffit material matches the historic material in size, profile, and texture.
  7. For Certificate of Appropriateness reviews, before review of proposed synthetic siding or soffit work, the following material must be submitted to the Historic Preservation Commission:
    1. Photographs showing evidence and extent of deterioration of existing wood siding (or site visit by review team).
    2. Cost estimate with detailed breakdown of both replacement and repair work, produced by proposed installation contractor demonstrating that repair of existing siding is not economically feasible.
    3. Photographs showing all areas to be covered by synthetic siding or soffits.
    4. Samples of existing and proposed synthetic siding.
    5. Name and address of proposed synthetic siding installation contractor, with list of successful applications in the area.
  8. No new trim or moldings may be added to historic exterior surfaces unless it can be shown that such trim would have been historically used for that type of building.


H. Window Policy

  1. Windows are significant character-defining elements of historic buildings.  Do not destroy the character of a historic building by maintenance, repair or replacement of existing windows.  Therefore avoid the removal or alteration of windows wherever possible.  It is important to respect the stylistic intention of the historic architect or builder when repairing or replacing historic windows.
  2. Maintain and routinely repair rather than rebuild, repair or replace existing windows.  Maintenance and routine repair of windows shall include:
    1. Replacement of broken glass, and/or associated muntins, moldings or glazing compound with material that matches the original in shape, size and material
    2. Scraping, priming and repainting of window sash and/or frame
    3. General upkeep such as caulking around frames and sills, or replacing weatherstripping
    4. Repair and replacement of window hardware that matches the original in scale and design
  3. Rebuild or repair portions of existing window frames, sashes, sills, or portions thereof, rather than replace complete windows unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
    1. Repair procedures for wood windows shall include the following:
      1. Reinforcing, splicing, patching or rebuilding portions of the window using the same material constructed to the same configuration, size and shape as the original.
      2. Filling or consolidating existing wood members with cellulose type wood fillers or chemical materials such as plastics
    2. Repair procedures for steel or metal windows shall include the following:
      1. Replacing individual deteriorated or rusted frame or mullion sections using the same metal to match size, configuration and finish of original. Firmly attach new members to the original so that it is not possible to detect replacement material from the street.
  4. Repair rather than replace historic decorative windows as defined herein.
  5. Replacement of historic windows may be approved under the following conditions:
    1. Historic windows are not decorative windows as defined herein.
    2. Repair of historic windows is technically infeasible.
    3. Appearance:
      1. Match critical details such as window size, shape, operation, glass configuration, material and finish.
      2. The appearance of the window sash, as well as opening size and decorative detailing shall look like the existing historic window from the street.
    4. Operation:
      1. Replacement windows shall operate in the same manner as the existing historic windows (for example, replace existing double-hung windows with new double hung windows, replace existing casement windows that open inward with new casement windows that open inward, etc.)
    5. Muntins:
      1. Replacement window sash shall have the same muntin ("lite" configuration) as the existing historic windows.  Insulating glass may be used in new windows.
      2. The configuration of replacement muntins shall have historic profiles and should form true divided lites (i.e., individual panes of glass) if existing windows were divided into individual panes.
      3. Exterior applied muntins that are permanently fixed to the exterior or both exterior and interior of the glass may be approved as a substitute for true divided lites.  Submit sample of muntin and fixing detail to be used.
      4. Do not propose interior snap-in muntins to be used in place of true divided lite muntins.  This type of detail will be considered acceptable only under unusual visual circumstances and where it is shown to be technically infeasible to provide either true divided lites or exterior applied muntins.
    6. Sash and frame materials
      1. Wood windows should be replaced in the same material but not necessarily in the same species of wood.
      2. Wood windows may be replaced with vinyl clad or aluminum clad wood windows with a finish that appears to match the existing finish as visible from the street.
      3. If the historic window being replaced is a simple one-over-one sash with non ornamental frames the material to be used for the replacement window may not have to replicate the original materials.  However, the sash and frame profiles and finish of the replacement window shall appear the same as the historic window from the street.
      4. Metal windows shall be replaced with new metal windows, but not necessarily the same metal.  Sash and frame profiles and finish of the replacement window shall appear the same as the historic window from the street.
  6. Replacement of non-original windows that have replaced the original windows at some time in the past
    1. Where new replacement windows are proposed to replace non-original windows in a building, the design and detail of the replacement window shall be based on the documented configuration of the building's original windows.  Such documentation may be obtained from historic photographs, drawings, or the design of the new replacement windows may be based on window configurations typical to the period of significance of the building.
    2. Where non-original windows are historic themselves and contribute to the history or significance of the building ("changes over time"), or are considered as having historic significance themselves, the design of the new replacement windows may be based on the existing non-original windows.  Such cases will be determined on an individual basis.
  7. Multi Family dwelling master plans:
    1. A master plan shall be created for the phased repair and/or replacement of windows in multi-family dwellings.  Such a master plan shall identify existing and proposed conditions, and provide design standards for systematic future replacement work.
  8. Replacement glass
    1. Replacement glass may be insulating glass.
    2. Replacement glass shall be clear if historic glass is clear.
    3. Reuse historic rolled ("wavey") glass from historic windows in new or replacement windows, unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
    4. Where historic tinted glass will be replaced, match color of historic tinted glass.
    5. Where historic reflective glass will be replaced, match reflectance and color of historic reflective glass.
    6. "Low-E" or other similar light-absorbing or reflective coatings on glass will be permitted only if it can be demonstrated that there will be no appearance change of glass color or reflective value from the historic appearance of the glass where visible from the street.
    7. Removal of historic leaded glass, art glass, stained glass, bevelled glass, prismatic glass, or Luxfer prisms shall not be permitted, unless it is irreparably damaged and repair is technically infeasible.
    8. Plexiglass,  Lexan or similar types of acrylic plastic glazing materials are not permitted to be used for replacement historic glass, unless it can be documented that these products were used in the historic building.
  9. Glass block will not be permitted as new or replacement windows unless it is characteristic of the style of the building (e.g. Art Deco style).  If historic glass block is replaced, it shall be replaced with new glass block with similar shape, color, reflectivity, and texture as the historic material.
  10. Storm Windows and Screens
    1. Historic existing storm and screen windows shall be repaired and reused unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
    2. New or replacement storm and screen windows shall match the original, or those characteristic of the period or style of the building, unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
    3. New storm windows or screens installed on windows where none existed in the past shall be installed on the interior of the historic window unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
    4. Clear glass storm windows with a minimum frame width may be installed as a protective measure for decorative art glass windows.  Provide sufficient ventilation to prevent condensation between the historic window and the protective storm window.
    5. New triple-track storm and screen combination window may be added to any window if the following conditions are met:
      1. Existing storm and screen windows are non-existent or are so deteriorated or damaged that they cannot be economically repaired.
      2. The new storm and screen windows can be installed without removing, damaging, or obscuring character-defining architectural features or trim, and will be  installed in such a way as to be able to be removed in the future without destroying architectural features.
      3. The new storm and screen windows are as unobtrusive as possible and match the historic window major glass division.
  11. Window Shutters
    1. New shutters on buildings may be permitted only if it can be shown that shutters were installed or may have been installed historically on the building.
    2. Shutter design, type, size, and material shall be characteristic of the significant period of the building.
I. Awning Policy
  1. Maintain and repair existing historic awnings
  2. New awnings may be permitted if constructed in materials appropriate to the style of the building.
  3. Electrically back-lit awnings will not be permitted.
  4. Complex awning shapes such as bubbles on domes, or arches on quarter vaults will not be permitted.
  5. Aluminum awnings will not be permitted unless they are characteristic of the period of significance.
  6. No new awnings will be permitted unless it can be shown that historic features of the building will not be damaged or destroyed in installing or removing awnings.

  7.  
J. Exterior Door Policy
  1. Repair rather than replace doors (entry, storm and screen) unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  2. If repair of historic doors (entry, storm and screen) is technically infeasible, new replacement doors may be approved if they duplicate the existing size, shape, proportion, profiles, hardware, details, glazing, panel type and design, and operation.
    1. Painted or stained wood, and aluminum clad doors are acceptable replacements for historic wood doors.
    2. Bronze or bronze-plated doors are acceptable replacements for historic bronze doors.
    3. Anodized aluminum or coated aluminum doors are acceptable replacements for historic aluminum doors.
    4. Painted steel or clad steel doors are acceptable replacements for historic steel doors.
  3. Profiles, sizes, and locations of panels shall match panels on historic doors.
  4. Repair rather than replace transom windows and door casings, or replicate such if there is evidence of their original configuration.
  5. Repair rather than replace existing historic hardware, unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  6. New hardware proposed to replace historic hardware should be simple, unobtrusive, and compatible with the style and period of significance of the building.
  7. Replacement glass in doors
    1. Replacement glass may be insulating glass.
    2. Replacement glass shall be clear if historic glass is clear.
    3. Where historic tinted glass will be replaced, match color of historic tinted glass.
    4. Where historic reflective glass will be replaced, match reflectance and color of historic reflective glass.
    5. "Low-E" or other similar light-absorbing or reflective coatings on glass will be permitted only if it can be demonstrated that there will be no appearance change of glass color or reflective value from the historic appearance of the glass where visible from the street.
    6. Removal of historic leaded glass, art glass, stained glass, bevelled glass, prismatic glass, or Luxfer prisms shall not be permitted, unless it is damaged and is technically infeasible to repair it.
    7. Plexiglass,  Lexan or similar types of acrylic plastic glazing materials are not permitted to be used for replacement historic glass, unless it can be documented that these products were used in the historic building.
  8. Glazing muntins:
    1. Replacement doors shall have the same muntin ("lite" configuration) as the existing historic doors.
    2. The configuration of replacement muntins shall have historic profiles and should form true divided lites (i.e., individual panes of glass)
      1. Snap-in muntins shall not be permitted
      2. Applied muntins which are permanently fixed to the glass may be approved.  Submit sample of muntin and fixing detail to be used.
  9. Elimination of the original or historic door opening, or creation of new door openings is not acceptable on surfaces visible from the street.
  10. Garage doors visible from the street:
    1. Repair rather than replace original or historic garage doors are significant to the character of the garage, unless technically infeasible to do so.
    2. If repair of historic garage doors is technically infeasible, new replacement garage doors may be approved if they duplicate the existing size, shape, proportion, profiles, hardware, details, glazing, panel type and design, and operation, and fit within the existing opening.

    3.  
K.  Mechanical Units
  1. Window air conditioners:  These will be permitted where it can be shown that no historic features will be removed in either installing or removing window air conditioners.
  2. Through-wall mechanical units will not be permitted on surfaces of the building visible from the street.


L. Porch Policy

  1. Historic porches visible from the street shall be maintained and repaired.
  2. If existing historic porches have deteriorated or become badly damaged they may be replaced in the same size and shape with appropriate new materials.  Retain as much of the existing porch materials unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  3. If  historic porches which have been enclosed in the past are proposed to be remodeled or altered, they  shall be restored to their appearance during the period of significance, unless the enclosure, by nature of its age, architectural significance, or other special circumstance, has achieved historic significance of its own.
  4. Proposed new porches shall be similar to historic porches which have been removed with regard to size, style and detail, to the extent that such historic porch can be documented.  Where inadequate  documentation exists for original porch, proposed new porches shall be typical of those built in the style of the historic building.
  5. Porches may be enclosed, as long as the construction of the enclosing elements are readily reversible, and as long as no character-defining features are damaged or obscured by the enclosure.  Removable, wood framed seasonal storm windows or screens are recommended over more permanent and scale-changing triple-track storms and screens or jalousie windows for porch enclosures.
  6. Proposed new railings and balusters on existing and new porches shall use materials and shall be designed in style similar in appearance to historic balusters and railings characteristic of the style of the historic building.
  7. New and existing wood which is visible from the street shall be painted unless it can be documented that the original wood was unpainted or stained (unpainted pressure treated wood will not be permitted).
  8. Porch floors shall be of a type characteristic of the style of the historic building.  Spaced planks shall not be used where painted tongue-and-groove boards would have been used historically.
  9. Concrete steps and porches will be permitted if it can be shown that they existed on the building historically or if they are characteristic of the style of building (e.g. Art Deco)
  10. Decks:
    1. New decks will be permitted if they are not visible from the street
    2. New decks which are visible from the street will be permitted if it can be shown that they are characteristic of the style of the historic building, or if they can be enclosed in partial height walls or balustrades which would be characteristic of the style of the historic building.
M. Roofing Policy
  1. Repair rather than replace roofing materials unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  2. If replacement of roofing materials is necessary, replacement materials shall be the same color, texture, and type of material as that which is being replaced, or the original historic roofing materials, unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  3. If historic roofing has been removed or covered in the past, and replacement of existing roofing is proposed,  selection of material for reroofing shall be similar with regard to size, style, and details of original historic roofing materials to the extent that such original roofing can be documented.  If no photographic or other documentation exists for original historic roofing materials, selection of new materials shall be typical of those used in the style of the historic building.
  4. Reroofing projects may be approved subject to the following requirements:
    1. Existing roofing materials are so deteriorated or damaged that they cannot be economically repaired.
    2. Proposed new roofing material can be installed without removing, damaging, or obscuring character-defining architectural features or trim.
    3. Proposed new roofing material matches as closely as possible the existing or historic roofing material in size, profile, and texture.
    4. The original form and shape of the roof shall be retained
    5. Character defining features of the roof shall be retained (cupolas, weather-vanes, dormers, cornices, brackets, chimneys, cresting, and finials)
    6. Flat roofs which are not visible from the street may be replaced with any new material.
  5. For Certificate of Appropriateness reviews, prior to review of proposed reroofing work, the following material must be submitted to the Historic Preservation Commission:
    1. Photographs showing evidence of deterioration of existing  roofing materials.
    2. Cost estimate with detailed breakdown of new and repair work, produced by proposed roofing contractor demonstrating that repair of existing roofing is not economically feasible.
    3. Photographs showing all areas to be covered by reroofing.
    4. Samples of existing and proposed roofing materials.
    5. Name and address of proposed roofing contractor, with list of successful applications in the area.
  6. Changes to the roof slope are not acceptable, unless earlier, non-historic changes are being reversed.
  7. Historic or existing roofing materials shall be maintained and repaired in place, or replaced with the following approved substitute roofing materials, retaining the same size, shape, and texture as the existing materials.
  8. Existing or Historic Material Acceptable New Replacement Material (in order or recommended preference):
    1. Slate
      1. Slate
      2. Cement/mineral fiber shingles
      3. Asphalt shingles of similar size, shapes, and colors
    2. Clay Tile
      1. Clay Tile
      2. Cement Tile
      3. Metal shingles of similar size, shapes, and colors
      4. Asphalt shingles of similar size, shapes, and colors
    3. Cement Tile
      1. Cement Tile
      2. Clay Tile
      3. Metal shingles of similar shapes
      4. Asphalt shingles of similar size, shapes, and colors
    4. Copper -- standing seam
      1. Copper -- standing seam (chemical accelerated patination shall not be permitted)
      2. Aluminum -- standing seam with green coating to imitate copper patina
      3. Galvanized steel -- standing seam with green coating to imitate copper patina
      4. Terne metal -- standing seam, painted with green paint to imitate copper patina
      5. Note:  In all cases, seam spacing and configuration of seams shall be similar to  existing or historic roof.
    5. Metal roofing -- other than copper
      1. Metal of same type and configuration as that which is being replaced
      2. Terne-coated stainless steel
      3. Lead coated copper
      4. Aluminum with same configuration as existing and coating to match color of existing  roofing
      5. Galvanized steel roofing with same configuration as existing and coating to match  color of existing roofing
    6. Cement-asbestos shingles
      1. Cement-Mineral fiber shingles of similar size, shapes and colors
      2. Asphalt shingles of similar size, shapes and colors
    7. Wood shingles
      1. Wood shingles -- stained to match color of existing shingles (do not use hand-split  and resawn wood "shakes")
      2. Asphalt shingles of similar size, shapes and colors (do not use "wood shake" or  heavily textured asphalt shingles)
    8. Asphalt shingles
      1. Asphalt shingles of similar size, shapes and colors
    9. Do not install a roofing material which is characteristic of a different period of significance, e.g. a Mission type clay tile roof on an Art Deco building.
    10. New roof valley materials shall be the same as  existing historic valleys, and shall be detailed to look the same.
  9. Gutters and downspouts:
    1. Maintain and repair existing gutters and downspouts in place.  If existing gutters and downspouts are deteriorated to the extent that they must be replaced, new gutters and downspouts shall match the original historic gutters and downspouts if such is known, or shall be of size and profile that would be characteristic of the period of significance.
    2. Note that galvanized half-round sheet metal gutters may in many cases be more appropriate for most historic buildings which had exposed gutters than the colonial profile aluminum gutters and downspouts commonly used today.
    3. Where built-in gutters exist and must be repaired, repair or replace only those sections which require it, using similar materials to existing historic built-in gutters.
  10. Cupolas, finials, cresting, and other roof ornament:  Where these objects exist, repair and maintain in place.  Where these do not exist, do not install new ornament unless it can be shown that it historically existed on the roof of that particular building.
  11. Skylights or roof windows may be installed only on surfaces which are not visible from the street.
  12. New fireplace or chimney flues shall be located on surfaces which are not visible from the street and shall be constructed either of masonry materials to match other chimneys on the building or shall be metal painted to match the color of roof.
  13. Roof vents or attic fans:
    1. Unless documentation exists that shows that  were present on visible portions of the historic roof, new roof vents and attic fans should be located on surfaces which are not visible from the street.
    2. They shall be as unobtrusive as possible and shall be painted to match color of roof.
  14. Toilet vent stacks shall be flashed with lead or shall be painted to match color of roof.
  15. Solar panels, satelitte dishes, and ham radio antennas:
    1. These types of objects will be permitted only on surfaces which are not visible from the street.
    2. If location is required to be in an area which is visible from the street, submit drawing showing proposed location along with rationale as to why the object must be located in visible area.  If approved in such locations, use one or more of the following techniques to reduce visual impact of objects which are out of character with the historic district:
      1. Do not attatch such objects to historic materials, or, if that is not possible, attatch to historic materials using the least intrusive methods.  Submittal of method of attatchment will be required by the Commission to assist in determination of acceptability for location of such objects in an area which is visible from the street.
      2. Provide berms or other types of enclosures to hide such objects from street view.
      3. Paint objects with a color to blend with historic materials to which the object is attached.
      4. Do not damage existing building materials during installation of these objects, and assure that when the object is removed in the future, the removal process will not be likely to damage such materials
  16. Dormers:  See "New Addition Policy" section below.

  17.  
N.  Paint Policy
  1. Paint color selection is not regulated by the historic preservation ordinance.
  2. Do not paint masonry, concrete or stucco which has never been painted
  3. Do not paint historic roofing materials unless they were originally painted or intended to be painted (such as galvanized sheet metal or terne metal)
  4. Use only breathable paints (such as latex or acrylic latex paints) on stucco or masonry which has historically been painted, to allow vapor to escape.
  5. Do not use sandblasting, or high pressure water blasting to remove paint from masonry or wood surfaces (it is acceptable to use these methods for paint removal from cast iron or steel surfaces)
  6. Do not use transparent or opaque stains on surfaces which have been historically painted.
  7. Do not paint wood which has historically been stained
  8. Prior to repainting, remove only loose paint from surfaces that have been historically painted.  Complete removal of all paint from a surface is not necessary prior to repainting.  Where bare wood is exposed in preparation process, prime wood before painting finished coats.  The use of  open flame or propane torches to remove paint from siding is not allowed.

  9.  
O.  New Addition Policy
  1. New additions in historic districts must be compatible with the size, scale, set-back, massing, material, and character of the building to which it is attached.
  2. New additions shall not remove significant character-defining features or historic material visible from the street.
  3. To minimize impact of an addition on the historic building, additions shall be constructed on a secondary or tertiary facade.
  4. New additions shall not change the historic character of the building.
  5. New additions shall protect the historic significance of the building by making a visual distinction between old and new.
  6. Dormers:  Limit size of new dormers to 1/2 of roof area visible from the street.  Dormer roof design shall match the slope of main roof and shall be constructed in the same materials.  Dormer windows shall be similar to that of main house.
  7. Floor additions:  If an entire new floor or floors are added to a building, the overall bulk of the building as viewed from the street shall not be more than 1/3 larger than that of adjacent buildings.  Exterior materials of new floors shall be constructed in the same materials as the existing historic building, or in combinations of materials which may have been historically used within the style.
  8. Turrets, oriels, bays, sun-spaces, greenhouses, and cupolas:  These types of additions will be permitted only on surfaces which are not visible from the street, or on surfaces which are visible from the street if they were characteristic of the style of the house.  Shape, size, and details of visible additions of this type shall be typical of the style of the house.
  9. New flagpoles or flag brackets will be permitted in any location
  10. New mailboxes or house numbers will be permitted in any location


P.  New Building Policy

  1. A new building in a historic district must be compatible with the size, scale, set-back, massing, material, and character of  the buildings which surround it on the same and adjacent blocks (the zone of influence for new buildings is six blocks -- the block on which the building is proposed to be built, the two adjacent blocks on the same side of the street, and the three opposing blocks on the other side of the same street).
  2. A new building shall not change the historic character of the other buildings which surround it on the same and adjacent blocks.
  3. A new building shall have its front entrance facing the same direction as the majority of buildings on the same block, unless it can be shown that compatibility with adjacent buildings can be achieved better through a different orientation.
  4. A new building built in a historic district  shall be compatible but visually distinct from other buildings which surround it on the same and adjacent blocks.


Q. Garage Policy

  1. Maintain and repair historic garages visible from the street.  They may be altered to accommodate contemporary vehicles.
  2. New carports will be permitted only if it can be shown that carports are characteristic of the historic style of the principal building on the lot.
  3. New garages or carports must be compatible in style, size, material, roof profile, and details with the historic principle building on the lot.
  4. New garages and carports shall be accessed from the alley where alleys exist at the rear of any house.
  5. Where driveways and curb-cuts exist, do not widen.


R. Sign Policy

  1. Historic signs shall be maintained and repaired unless it is technically infeasible to do so.
  2. New signs shall be compatible with style of building.

  3.  
S. Exterior Lighting Policy
  1. New light fixtures may be added for lighting entrances or yards if the fixtures are compatible with the historic style of the building.
  2. High intensity discharge type light fixtures such as mercury vapor, high pressure sodium, low pressure sodium, or metal halide fixtures shall not be permitted to be mounted in locations where fixture glare will be visible from the street.
  3. High- or Low-pressure sodium lights are not permitted for major illumination of facades visible from the street unless their color is attenuated by combination with metal halide fixtures.


T. Site Features

  1. Historic landscaping shall be maintained.
  2. Fences:
    1. Historic fencing shall be maintained and repaired
    2. New fencing shall be either similar to historic fencing used at the site, or shall be characteristic of the period of significance.
    3. Metal or plastic slats shall not be used in chain link fencing visible from the street.
    4. "Stockade" type wood fences are not permitted for fences visible from the street.  Where Zoning Ordinance permits, solid wood fencing or walls which are visible from a street may be approved if they are designed in character with the historic building.
  3. Conjectural site elements:  Proposed site elements, such as "Victorian" type street or yard lighting, ornate benches, gazebos, or the like will not be permitted in areas visible from the street, unless historic documentation shows that they existed on the site, or unless they are characteristic of the period of significance.
  4. Sidewalks:
    1. If sidewalks are replaced, they should be replaced in materials similar to those used in historic sidewalks of the period of significance of the building.
    2. If historic concrete sidewalks are replaced, they shall be replaced with new concrete using "torpedo" sand with smooth aggregates.  Surface of sidewalk shall be weathered by hosing and brushing with stiff broom to expose the aggregate prior to concrete fully setting.
    3. If Village-owned historic slate sidewalk exists in front of building, it shall not be replaced, unless, in the opinion of the Village, it has been irreparably damaged.  If existing historic slate sidewalks are replaced, they shall be replaced with new slate of like thickness, color, and size.
    4. If historic slate sidewalk is damaged by owner or Owner's contractor during remodeling activities, cost of replacing historic slate sidewalk shall be borne by person responsible for breakage.
  5. Excavations for basement light and ventilation shall be permitted only on surfaces which are not visible from the street.


U. Special Accessibility Considerations

  1. Where provisions for accessibility for disabled persons are proposed to be added to a portion of a historic building visible from the street, every effort shall be made to integrate the accessibility provision with the historic design of the building.
  2. Reversable and readily removable accessibility provisions, such as ramps or chair lifts, should be provided to prevent permanent damage to the historic fabric of the building.

 

Bibliography

_______.  Books on Frank Lloyd Wright.  Oak Park (The Frank Lloyd Wright Home and Studio Foundation), 1992.

_______.  Frank Lloyd Wright Heritage Trail.  Oak Park, Thatcher Woods Area Council, 1993

Cummings, Kathleen Roy. Architectural Records in Chicago.  Chicago, 1981

Brooks, H. Allen.  The Prairie School.  New York, 1972.

Brooks, H. Allen, ed. Prairie School Architecture -- Studies from "The Western Architect."  New York, 1983.

Fields, Jeanette S., ed. A Guidebook to the Architecture of River Forest.  Chicago, 1981.

Fleming, John, Hugh Honour, Nicholas Pevsner.  The Penguin Dictionary of Architecture.

Guarino, Jean.  Oak Park -- A Pictorial History.  St. Louis, 1988.

Harris, Cyril.  Dictionary of Architecture and Construction.  New York:  McGraw-Hill, 1975.

Hasbrouck, Wilbert R., AIA, and Paul E. Sprague, Phd.  The Hasbrouck-Sprague of Historic Architcture in Oak Park.    Oak Park, 1974.

McAlester, Virginia and Lee. A Field Guide to American Houses.  New York:  Alfred A. Knopf, 1984.

Moss, Roger.  Century of Color.  New York, 1981

Moss, Roger, and Gail Caskey Winkler.  Victorian Exterior Decoration.  New York, 1987

Phillips, Steven J. The Old House Dictionary:  An Illustrated Guide to American Domestic Architecture 1600 to 1940.  Lakewood, Colorado:  American Source Books, 1989.

Poppeliers, John and S. Allen Chambers.  What Style is It?  Washington, D.C.:  Preservation Press, 1983.

Radford, William A. Old House Measured and Scaled Detail Drawings for Builders and Carpenters.  New York (Dover), 1983.

Sanderson, Arlene, et al.  Ridgeland Revealed:  Guide to Architecture of the Ridgeland-Oak Park Historic District.  Oak Park, 1993.

Shoppell, R. W., et. al. Turn-of-the-Century Houses, Cottages and Villas.  New York (Dover), 1983.

Sprague, Paul E.  Guide to Frank Lloyd Wright and Prairie School Architecture in Oak Park.  Oak Park, 1976.

Steiner, Frances H. Frank Lloyd Wright in Oak Park and River Forest.  Chicago, 1983.

Steiner, Frances H. Victorian Oak Park.  Chicago, 1983.

Stickley, Gustav.  Craftsman Bungalows. New York (Dover), 1988.

Stickley, Gustav.  Craftsman Homes.  New York (Dover), 1979.

Stickley, Gustav.  More Craftsman Homes. New York (Dover), 1982.

von Holst, Hermann Valentin. Country and Suburban Homes of the Prairie School Period.  New York (Dover), 1982.

Whiffen, Marcus.  American Architecture Since 1780:  A Guide to Architectural Styles.  Cambridge:  MIT Press, 1992.
 
 

End of Oak Park Historic Preservation Commission Architectural Review Guidelines